What is a Flocculant?

Originally Posted By: GLAZEMIXER
Originally Posted On: 10/1/2007 12:42:05 PM
Last Updated On: 10/1/2007 12:48:32 PM
GLAZEMIXER
10/1/2007 12:42:05 PM
Topic: Glaze Calculation and Experimentation

What is a Flocculant?

A flocculant is a soluble material that is added to a glaze to increase the viscosity (thickness) and increase the time it takes for the glaze to settle.

The result is a glaze that seems thicker (even though it contains the same amount of water and dry material).

A flocculant changes the arrangement of the particle in the glaze. The effect makes the partles attract to each other rather than repel each other. As a result, they join up into larger groups making it easier to remain suspended in water and making glaze settlement less compact.

Vinegar, gelatine, epsom salts (magnesium sulfate) and aluminum sulfate are examples of flocculants.
What is Viscosity?
GLAZEMIXER
10/1/2007 12:47:00 PM
Topic: Glaze Calculation and Experimentation

What is a Deflocculant?

A deflocculant is a material that is used to reduce the viscosity of a glaze.

The effect is a glaze that seems thinner (even though it contains the same amount of water and dry material)

Most deflocculants neutralize the positive charges on clay particles. The clay particles no longer attract each other, become smaller particles and settle very quickly.

Nepheline syenite and other soluable materials can actually deflocculate a glaze as they disolve.

Some examples of deflocculants are Darvan 7 and Sodum Silicate.
GLAZEMIXER
10/1/2007 12:48:32 PM
Topic: Glaze Calculation and Experimentation

RE:What is a Flocculant?

If your glaze is settling very quickly into a very hard mass at the bottom of the bucket, you may need to add a flocculant.

See the Epsom Salt posts.
Why Use Epsom Salts in a Ceramic Glaze Recipe?
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